best affordable restaurants in sydney

Why we love it: Even though this is about as big-ticket as restaurants get, the intimate and unpretentious mood will make you feel right at home. Recently Added - new to old . You’ll want to double up on the pane fritti with anchovies and keep the Chianti topped right up. Spain meets South America in a classy, clever tapas-style menu – famous for such snacks as kingfish ceviche on grilled garlic sourdough or Bodega "fish fingers" (sashimi Kingfish on garlic toast with cuttlefish ceviche and mojama for A$16). The Swillhouse Group's beast of a brasserie, in a CBD basement bathed in OTT Belle Époque detail. Time Out tip: At a mere $19, the burger on the bar menu – flaunting a David Blackmore full-blood Wagyu patty – remains the best affordable luxury between buns in Sydney. This is authentic Naples-approved pie topped with only the best ingredients, such as prosciutto, shaved parmesan and fresh herbs. Pull up a seat. A provocative degustation-only diner that flips the fine-dining script, courtesy of acclaimed chef Clatyon Wells. Renowned as a popular three-hated restaurant in Sydney, Sepia has also made itself known on a global scale as it was named as the 84th best restaurant in the world. The beachside benchmark for ‘paddock-to-plate’ dining, now nearing its third decade of operation. Or the Negronis, which are available by the litre. A more relaxed approach to degustation dining in a cosy, heritage-listed, former corner shop. What is it? What is it? What is it? Yes, Korean fried chicken, mandoo and dolsot bibimbap are on offer, but branching out into more unfamiliar territory here yields incredibly delicious and memorable rewards. Or the Negronis, which are available by the litre. And don't forget to order the chicken. Why we love it: So many restaurants like this buck tradition and trade on style over substance, but Cho Cho San really gets the balance right. Make a meze hour booking between 5 and 5.30pm Monday through Thursday, and you’ll score a set of souped-up snacks for two for $60, with drinks for only a tenner. It’s nigh impossible to imagine a more enviable spot for a restaurant on Earth than the south end of Bondi, perched above the world’s most Instagrammed swimming pool. What is it? It pays to remember they’re open ‘til midnight, in a city starved for options at that hour. The soft pretzel with whipped bottarga is still THE bar snack to be reckoned with, housemade pastas are properly al dente and it’s never a question of which bottle of wine from the forward-thinking list to choose, but how many. It’s full of heart, the kind of operation that makes you want to stand up and cheer – and that’s before the jollof rice lands on the table. The go-to choice when it comes to elegant, modern Greek eats. There’s not a dining room in the city that can hold a candle to the soft-focus beauty that Merivale have achieved in the final instalment of the Newport’s renewal, and though we can’t afford the $2 million price tag on a Newport residence, an afternoon of café society luxury can be yours. Fortunately, food quality and service smarts aren’t sacrificed in the process. The northern haven of long lunch luxury from the Merivale crew. Book well ahead. On the edge of Sydney's oldest Chinatown (these days there are several), watch your meal being assembled through the shopfront window. Suckling pig pulled straight from the asador. Sydney's Japanese eating landscape is becoming increasingly bright due to an influx of interesting, authentic spots, patronised by a large Japanese expat and student community. Honest, ingredient-focused farm-to-table fare by Danielle Alvarez in a stunner of a dining room. It matters not whether it’s raw or roasted, filletted or whole – what you get is the cream of the ocean’s crop, with jaw-dropping wine and seasoned hospitality to boot. A concept we can all get behind – ramen by day, and edgy izakaya by night. There’s not a dining room in the city that can hold a candle to the soft-focus beauty that Merivale have achieved in the final instalment of the Newport’s renewal, and though we can’t afford the $2 million price tag on a Newport residence, an afternoon of café society luxury can be yours. • Kushiyaki Azuma, Regent Place, 501 George Street, + 61 2 9267 7775. The service team’s unrivalled professionalism? There's pho (beef noodle soup) on every corner, but this large noodle shop is famous for its chicken and egg noodle soup, plus the legendary, crunchy "criskin" (crisp-skin) chicken you'll spot on every table. Why we love it: Every Tom, Dick and Harriet focuses on the local, seasonal and sustainable these days, but chef-owner Sean Moran was something of a visionary when he opened this Bondi stayer in 1993. A total box ticker. Zomato is the best way to discover great places to eat in your city. Time Out tip: You don’t need to give up your phone to sink Martinis in the lounge, but you should anyway – the boss can wait. • Extracted from the Sydney Morning Herald Good Food Guide 2010, co-edited by Simon Thomsen and Joanna Savill, published by Penguin Australia at A$29.95. The go-to choice when it comes to elegant, modern Greek eats. The concise menu remains scrawled on the blackboard, with the lights down just as low; service still comes with swagger; and, most importantly, the crisp-fried calamari, pillow-soft lasagne, scampi spaghetti and tiramisù continue to knock socks off. In a town full of top-notch pizza, these are the pies to beat, with upbeat service to match. Time Out tip: The stools that surround and overlook the open kitchen are the best seats in the house. Why we love it: Both the relatively recent renovation and overhaul of the menu by head chef Joel Bickford have brought the restaurant firmly into the here and now, thanks to the kitchen’s less-is-more approach and a brighter spotlight on native ingredients. Hyper-seasonal plates of premium produce and pristine proteins from a kitchen powered solely by firewood and open flames. The street-food staples, like char koay teow and nasi goreng, are so good they’re hard to ignore. Fresh, whimsical takes on Japanese izakaya staples in a stripped-back sliver that epitomises minimal chic. The Sydney outpost of David Chang’s world-famous culinary empire, where Caribbean cooking reaches new heights. This hole-in-the-wall has a huge lunchtime following. Heartfelt Korean cooking in a Surry Hills bolthole that will make you reevaluate your definition of ‘hole-in-the-wall’. A handful of private dining rooms and larger-than-life mains make this an ideal spot for a group. 50 things to do in Sydney at least once in your life. Watching the graceful, linen-clad chefs and servers get the job done is practically a night at the ballet, except here it comes with first-rate rack of lamb and a garden’s worth of produce at its prime. The Harbour City’s obsession with pasta is at an all-time high, but thanks to a focus on lesser-known shapes and a willingness to stray from the tried and true, Ragazzi stands out. The gargantuan menu caters to every whim and fancy, but beef is the way to go. Why we love it: This is as close as you’ll get in Sydney to a destination-worthy drinking spot in the backstreets of Paris or Milan. Time Out tip: Watch Hastie in action on the latest series of Chef’s Table if you haven’t. We’ve picked out 50 things to do in Sydney at least once, from kayaking on the harbour and cocktails with a view to our favourite weekly markets. What is it? Sydney’s finest Malaysian eatery, hands down. Best Dining in Sydney, New South Wales: See 361,516 Tripadvisor traveller reviews of 6,363 Sydney restaurants and search by cuisine, price, location, and more. Competition is much fiercer nowadays, but each and every dish on the dizzyingly long menu still delivers the same genuine Scoville-fuelled thrills that made it such a hit in the first place. What is it? • Kam Fook, 500 Oxford Street, Bondi Junction, 9386 9889. This is the Time Out EAT list, our picks for the best places to dine in Sydney right now, from hot newcomers to time-honoured institutions, ranked by our expert local editors. Time Out tip: You’ll find Chiosco, their “BYO and barefoot-friendly” trattoria offshoot, further along the jetty. It might fly a bit under the radar compared to some of the other heavy hitters on this list, but ask a handful of big-name chefs where they’d head on a night off, and it’s a guarantee that LuMi will come up. Meat-centric it may be, but Porteno happens to be a haven for pescatarians and vegetarians, too. It’s a great shout for a business lunch, but things are substantially more tranquil at night when the wharf is less chaotic. Summon the pros for assistance with the wine list, which is packed with treasures. A cavernous corner spot in Darlinghurst specialising in housemade pastas and Italian-leaning home cooking. Pull up a pew at the bar for schmick small plates and a glass of something glorious instead. Best Cheap Eats in Sydney, New South Wales: Find Tripadvisor traveler reviews of THE BEST Sydney Cheap Eats and search by price, location, and more. An inner-city bolthole dishing up hoppers, sambols and cooked-to-order curries with profound depth of flavour, all made from a kaleidoscope of spices ground and roasted in-house. What is it? It is hard to beat the fresh seafood, waterfront views and diversity of cuisines in Sydney. If a Spritz with a side of sea breeze is what the doctor calls for, sidle over to. Tell them you’re sharing, and the chefs will portion out the plates accordingly. The custom-made crockery? Time Out tip: Tell them you’re sharing, and the chefs will portion out the plates accordingly. If you need to loosen your necktie and let out your inner Don Draper, this is the place. Prepare yourself for rich dishes, and don’t eat much beforehand – this is no-holds-barred territory. One of Australia’s most cherished restaurants, tucked away in an unassuming Stanmore corner terrace. Popularity - high to low . So much thought goes into these dishes, which are layered to the high heavens with acid, fat, ferments and a pantry’s worth of Japanese ingredients. - See 817 traveler reviews, 366 candid photos, and great deals for Sydney, Australia, at Tripadvisor. But then again, so is the housemade mortadella number with parmesan and green olives. The drinks have always been a draw at 10 William St, and for the vine-dedicated there's the chance to get lost in a deep list of minimal-intervention … A glassed-in box at the end of a Pyrmont wharf showcasing a show-stopping collision of Japanese and Italian influences. What is it? But then again, so is the housemade mortadella number with parmesan and green olives. No two ways about it – 2020 has been a challenging year for us all. The flagship CBD fine diner from all-star chef-sommelier duo Brent Savage and Nick Hildebrandt. Bon appétit! A pedigreed CBD newcomer fusing Italian fundamentals and flashy technique, care of two of the city’s top chefs. Blood sausage hot off the parilla. What is it? And you’ve got to applaud a place with enough moxie to put steak Diane back on the menu in this day and age. Now, in a move totally in tune with the zeitgeist, the kitchen’s gone entirely vegan – and there’s no better place to appreciate fruits, vegetables, nuts, grains and seeds and the temperatures, textures and techniques that really make them shine. World-renowned chef Peter Gilmore’s artful, imaginative interpretation of Australian cuisine, under the soaring sails of the Sydney Opera House. Simply put, there’s no other top-end restaurant tasting menu quite like it. What is it? It’s also BYO, but rummaging through the whopping wine list is part of the fun. And be sure to get stuck into the awesome wine list. Why we love it: From the trolley proffering bumps of caviar and vodka shots to the marble bathrooms straight outta Architectural Digest, Mimi’s is all about opulence. A shrine to grade-A steak and seafood, housed in larger-than-life, heritage-listed Art Deco digs. Why we love it: When Spice I Am opened in 2004, it broke new ground by staying true to the source material and refusing to compromise on spice levels. Turns out falafel in dumpling form isn’t half as kooky an idea as it sounds. • Mamak, 15 Goulburn Street, Haymarket, +61 2 9211 1668. If we’re talking dinner, cue the spanner crab and truffle chawanmushi, burrata topped with bonito flakes, spicy miso lamb ribs and a couple of red-miso eggplant handrolls. Rosso Pomodoro, Balmain The affluent harbourside suburb of Balmain is home to some of Sydney's best, and cheapest, pizzas, with locals queuing to eat at Rosso Pomodoro. Every Tom, Dick and Harriet focuses on the local, seasonal and sustainable these days, but chef-owner Sean Moran was something of a visionary when he opened this Bondi stayer in 1993. Organic cauliflower lightly scorched in the wood-fired oven. Ground zero for cheese, charcuterie, tinned fish and canned cocktails galore. Real-deal Japanese with a modern twang, anchored by astoundingly delicious yakitori. Look beyond them, however, and you’ll find pleasure in just about everything else coming out of the kitchen, whether it’s refined (gingery steamed eggs with king prawns), playful (Vegemite pork ribs) or just plain silly (rendang made with actual KFC chicken). Unlike at so many other pizza parlours, Bella Brutta’s antipasti kick ass. Fourteen years on, it’s still kicking goals. Book a Table. They’re unafraid to reboot saltimbocca and squid ink risotto, and they go straight for the jugular with the likes of luxurious lobster maccheroncini and fontina-coated cauliflower gratin. Much like a ride on the Manly Ferry or the coastal walk from Coogee to Bondi, eating inside the Opera House is a Sydney rite of passage. Time Out tip: They don’t accept bookings, so have a back-up plan in place if you don’t do waitlists. Time Out tip: Picco Leo, their more casual café and bakery next door, cranks out cracking coffees and spot-on slabs of Roman-style pizza. Salads from A$9.50. A wine bar is set to open within the restaurant shortly, so keep your eyes peeled. An effortlessly cool, poky natural wine bar and restaurant in a two-storey Paddo terrace. The lion’s share of the à la carte items are also available as half portions. By introducing Nigerian home cooking to the Inner West, Little Lagos has expanded both our cultural fluency and our culinary vocabulary. What is it? Dumplings here are as good as they come, but the full range is only available at lunch, so head in during the day if dim sum is your jam. There's nothing better than eating with a view – good thing we're in Sydney. Merivale’s highly anticipated, loosely Mediterranean high-flyer on Coogee Pavilion’s middle level. From the tang of the acharu pickles to the bold-as-hell black curry and eye-openingly fragrant love cake, it’s hard to think of more exciting food in Sydney right now. 10 William St. Hyper-seasonal plates of premium produce and pristine proteins from a kitchen powered solely by firewood and open flames. Sydney’s finest Malaysian eatery, hands down. Familiar Middle Eastern flavours given new life in big, breezy, bustling surrounds on Crown Street. Chef-owner Tristan Rosier strips away the frippery tied to pointy-end restaurants without sacrificing what matters at Arthur, with a tasting menu full of contrasts. If you have, then you know the bar is the only place to sit. There’s no shortage of restaurants along Wulugul Walk, but none of them come close to Cirrus, which excels across the board. Why we love it: Three words: the clam pizza. Amen. The bottom line, however, is still the same: if it’s on this list, we think it’s excellent – and we hope that you do, too. Why we love it: Nour set out to do something different from the multitude of Sydney’s Lebanese restaurants, and it definitely lives up to that promise. What is it? A meal at Bert’s is as close as we can ever get to actually living the jazz age in all its glory. Cost - low to high . A shrine to grade-A steak and seafood, housed in larger-than-life, heritage-listed Art Deco digs. Cast your account balance woes aside, and let loose. Fourteen years on, it’s still kicking goals. , Mimi’s is all about opulence. There’s never a bad time to be at Ester, but if there’s a best time, it’s Sunday lunch, when sunlight spills into the bare-bones room and one bottle of funked-up natty wine turns into three in a flash. The addition of a marble gelato bar and a more approachable menu – featuring the likes of a DIY Moreton Bay bug piadina and mud crab you wrap up like san choy bau – have made it an even more likeable one. What is it? GC’s pippies in XO sauce are legendary and every bit deserving of their celebrity status. One of the most highly regarded Italian restaurants Down Under, now red meat-free and more relaxed thanks to a recent makeover. Up for something more casual? If we’re talking lunch, it’s gotta be the uncompromisingly rich A5 Wagyu ramen or the duck consommé with smoked duck breast and yuzu jus. Fully realised contemporary Cantonese in a behemoth of a basement, decked to the nines in Shanghai nostalgia. The adventurous (and affordable) drinks list keeps pace with a menu that spans miso eggplant sticks, tonkatsu-stuffed steamed buns and teriyaki fish collars, with matcha soft serve at the finish line. Hit up the more compact CBD sibling. Time Out tip: Need lunch on the fly? Boasting split levels and 250 seats, the new Town Hall branch has a lot more elbow room if you can’t snag a spot at the original. Why we love it: It might fly a bit under the radar compared to some of the other heavy hitters on this list, but ask a handful of big-name chefs where they’d head on a night off, and it’s a guarantee that LuMi will come up. The lion’s share of the à la carte items are also available as half portions. This is as close as you’ll get in Sydney to a destination-worthy drinking spot in the backstreets of Paris or Milan. Certainly Sydney’s – and dare we say Australia’s – most revolutionary seafood restaurant, helmed by superstar chef Josh Niland. Time Out tip: There are only 40 bowls of ramen available at lunch each day, and no bookings are taken, so plan to arrive the moment it opens. Why we love it: More and more chefs are cooking with fire these days, but none pull it off like Lennox Hastie and his team. Time Out tip: Meat-centric it may be, but Porteno happens to be a haven for pescatarians and vegetarians, too. Time Out tip: Baretto, their small kiosk down below, is pole position for a post-surf panino or alfresco aperitivo. Exactly where you want to be, when a long Italian-ish lunch by the sea is on the cards. What is it? This is the total package, topped off with stupendous crème caramel that'll stick to your ribs.

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